News

Conference Travel Grant Award Winners Announced

Congratulations to the winners of the NCIS Conference Support Grants.  The Awards Committee are currently considering the submisions received for the Fall 2015 cycle, and the award winners will be announced by 1 November, 2015. The Awards Committee is now accepting applications for the next grant cycle. Deadline: April 1, 2016.

For more information visit http://ncis.org/grants/all.

The following members have been awarded grants:

2014: Neil Dukas and Jolanta Wrobel Best

Dr. Dukas participated in the first NCIS-cosponsored session of the American Historical Association Annual Meeting, “From Surviving to Thriving: Practicing History as an Independent Scholar,” giving a talk entitled, “The Independent Historian and the Questions of 'Academic” Rigor.”

Dr. Wrobel Best presented a paper entitled “Vilnius, Czeslaw Milosz, and Facing the River,” as part of the panel “Like a Pendulum Swinging Back and Forth: Images of Vilnius/Wilno in Polish Culture after 1989,” at the conference of the Association for Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies.  Unfortunately Dr. Wrobel Best was unable to attend the meeting in person and therefore declined the grant.  She presented her paper remotely.

There were no Research Support Grants awarded in the Fall cycle, due to insufficient entries.

2015: Gary L. Herstein

Dr Herstein was awarded a Conference Support Grant for his paper "Whitehead’s 'Intuitive' Interpretation of Relativity" which he was due to give as part of the "Intuition in Mathematics and Physics" panel at the 2015 International Whitehead Conference "Seizing an Alternative: Toward an Ecological Civilization" in Claremont, CA in June 2015.

Independent Scholar Wins MacArthur Foundation Award

Excerpted from The Washington Post article, September 17, 2014:
 
Pamela Long, 71, an independent scholar based in Washington, works from home and almost never answers her phone. So when she received an e-mail from the MacArthur Foundation asking her to call, she thought it was for an interview about someone else who had been nominated. Then she was told she had won. In the days that followed, her initial reaction — shock — slowly gave way to relief.
 
As a historian not affiliated with a university, she never knows how she will afford to do her work — research on the science and technology of 15th- and 16th-century Europe — from year to year. So far she has supported herself through grants. “But I don’t think you can get a grant every year for the rest of your entire life,” she said on a video call from Rome, where she is studying archival material for a book tentatively titled “Engineering the Eternal City.”
 
“Therefore I didn’t quite know how I was going to continue. Even though I was going to continue because I’m obsessed with what I’m doing, so there’s nothing that could really stop me. But it’s a wonderful thing because I don’t have to worry about that anymore.”

Pages

Subscribe to News